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Fight for $15

It is time to increase the minimum wage and address poverty and income inequality in Nova Scotia. As the cost of living continues to go up, workers earning minimum wage cannot make ends meet.

Nova Scotia minimum wage leaves full-time workers living well below the poverty line. The Nova Scotia Federation of Labour believes that work should lift you out of poverty.  It’s time for the Nova Scotia government to make a real increase the minimum wage so that nobody is left behind.

Help us fight for $15/hr. It’s only fair!  

Add your name to support our campaign: Click here

It is time to increase the minimum wage and address poverty and income inequality in Nova Scotia. As the cost of living continues to go up, workers earning minimum wage cannot make ends meet.  

Nova Scotia minimum wage leaves full-time workers living well below the poverty line. The Nova Scotia Federation of Labour believes that work should lift you out of poverty.  It’s time for the Nova Scotia government to make a real increase the minimum wage so that nobody is left behind. 

Predictably, low-wage employers and their right-wing counterparts are trying to discourage all the good arguments for raising the minimum wage to $15 over time in a thoughtful way that will improve the lives of their workers. They’ve latched onto a central theme, and it has been the same theme for a long time, “Now is not the right time,” they say. But the truth is according to them, now is never the right time for low-wage employers! Their arguments are self-serving and based on myths, misconceptions and, in some cases, outright lies.

According to a recent report by the CCPA-NS, about 40% of children living in poverty in Nova Scotia live in a family with at least one full-time earner; between one-third and one-half of all poor children in this province are members of working families. The stress of struggling to make ends meet takes a severe toll on people’s health and has an adverse effect on our society as a whole.

Here’s a list of the top 10 reasons why a $15 minimum is still the way to go and why the government should ignore the crocodile tears coming from low-wage employers and their lobbyists.

 

A growing number of Nova Scotians are concerned about the increasing proportion of low-wage, part-time, casual, temporary and insecure employment. Too many workers are not protected by the minimum standards outlined in existing employment and labour laws. In fact, labour standards have not been looked at in their entirety since something like 1972, that’s far too long, and we need to modernize our labour Standards.

Now you can be part of the change by signing on and getting updates and to work with the Federation of Labour to change employment and labour laws to accomplish the following:

  • Ensure that part-time, temporary, casual and contract workers receive the same pay and benefits as their full-time, permanent counterparts;
  • Promote full-time, permanent work with adequate hours for all those who choose it;
  • Offer fair scheduling with proper notice;
  • Provide at least seven (7) days of paid sick leave each year;
  • Prevent employers from downloading their responsibilities for minimum standards onto temporary agencies, sub-contractors or workers themselves;
  • End the practice of contract flipping, support wage protection and job security for workers when companies change ownership or contracts expire;
  • Extend minimum protections to all workers by eliminating exemptions for some workers;
  • Protect workers who stand up for their rights;
  • Offer proactive enforcement of the laws through adequate public staffing and meaningful penalties for employers who violate the laws;
  • Make it so employers cannot skirt the law by taking your tips or making workers pay for uniforms etc.
  • Make it easier for workers to join unions; and
  • Ensure all workers are paid at least $15 an hour, regardless of their age;